Holocaust Remembrance Day: Grieve or Rejoice?

By | April 12, 2018 | 11 Comments

April 12 is Holocaust Remembrance Day, also known as Yom Ha-Shoah. The day is marked by ceremonies in Israel and across the world, which are attended by members of Jewish organizations and a few non-Jews. In fact, except in Israel, the day is largely ignored.

Still, one must admit that there are various ways to observe such a holiday. Some grieve for the six million Jews (including one million children) who were exterminated by the Nazis and their helpers, and resolve to do whatever they can to assure that it never happens again. Others rejoice at the memory of the Holocaust, and resolve to do whatever they can to assure that it does happen again ‒ as soon as possible. Whether there are more rejoicers or grievers in the world is a question I leave for your consideration.

Mireille Knoll, shown with her granddaughter, was an 85-year-old French Jew. She was a Holocaust survivor, who managed to evade the 1942 roundup of Jews in the Paris region. They were crowded into the bicycle stadium, the Velodrome d’Hiver, before being transported to death camps. French authorities carried out the roundup before the Nazis asked them to do so. The Velodrome no longer exists. The memory of what happened there also barely exists.

Madame Knoll lived with a caretaker in an apartment. On March 24 she was assaulted by two men. She was stabbed 11 times and then partially burned, apparently in an unsuccessful attempt to set the apartment on fire and cover up the crime. Both men are in custody. Police have released few details. One was a 27-year-old neighbor who had previously been charged with sexually assaulting the 12-year-old daughter of Mme. Knoll’s caretaker. Why he was roaming free was not explained. The other assailant was a 21-year-old homeless man with a history of violence.

Police did not name either assailant, but the neighbor was described as a Muslim. They were charged with murder with the hate-crime of anti-Semitism, a charge that French officials are hesitant to make. So when they do make it, one can assume that the evidence is overwhelming.

Dr. Sarah Allal Halimi was a 65-year-old retired physician and mother. On April 4, 2017, not quite a year before the murder of Mme. Knoll, she was beaten and thrown out of a third-floor window by a Muslim neighbor who quoted the Quran and shouted “Allahu akbar.” He was declared insane and committed to an institution.

As with the Knoll case, authorities were reluctant to name the religion or ethnicity of the assailant. In fact, it was not until February 2018 ‒ ten months after the crime ‒ that a judge reversed the earlier decision and agreed to call Dr. Halimi’s murder a hate crime of anti-Semitism. Dealing with a complex problem is difficult enough. Refusing even to name the problem makes the solution unattainable.

Lt. Col. Arnaud Beltrame exchanged himself for a hostage and was killed by a Muslim terrorist in southern France. This happened the same day that Mme. Knoll was murdered. Beltrame was shot and his throat was slashed. His heroic action was praised the world over. We need heroes in times of crisis.

But perhaps even more, we need people with the wisdom to prevent crises. For example, we need officials with the wisdom to limit immigration to those who will share the ideals of our nation and our culture. If we had such officials, Madame Knoll and Doctor Halimi would still be enjoying their families, and Lt. Col. Beltrame would still be serving his country.

The purpose of Holocaust Remembrance Day is not merely a history lesson. The purpose is to make “Never again!” a reality rather than just a slogan. Until we take that mission seriously, we will have more Knolls and Halimis to mourn, and we will need more Beltrames to admire.

Author’s Note: If you want a vague idea of that the Holocaust was really like, and if you have a strong stomach, watch this documentary film made by award-winning director George Stevens for the U.S. Government. https://archive.org/details/gov.archives.arc.43452

Contact: dstol@prodigy.net. You are welcome to publish or post these articles, provided that you cite the author and website.
www.stolinsky.com

11 Comments

  • After the Holocaust and all the Facts were established, How can any people be willing to have that happen Again? That is Madness, In Our Home we Grieve, for the Soul’s that were Murdered, Truly Never Again need;s to be a fact not a slogan. Life is to be Cherished.

  • Edward Reese says:

    And, at least in Germany, it was preceded by confiscation of firearms. A single Jew with a gun would not have stopped a squad of Nazi soldiers but If it was me and I was going to die anyhow, I’d like to take a few of the sons of bitches with me.
    Never Again, although the world seems to not lack numbers of people who would repeat the holocaust and others who just wouldn’t care. if we don’t take action politically, who else would?

  • Jerry says:

    No. Words just tears

    • David Stolinsky says:

      True, words are totally inadequate, even the most eloquent. But actions – yes, actions are what we need.

  • Israel Rozemberg says:

    If the Holocaust is not sufficient a lesson for the American Jewry to exercise, support, defend and admire the founding fathers’ US Constitution and Bill of Rights, particularly our 2nd Amendment, then I fear those who fell to the hatred and institutionalized murder of evil perished in vain. Never Again is not just a phrase. It is an active form of self defense that needs to be exercised all the time!!

  • David Stolinsky says:

    In 1940 it looked like the Germans were going to invade Britain. Churchill prepared a speech that included, “You can always take one with you.” He didn’t have to give the speech, because the Germans didn’t invade, perhaps because Hitler sensed the Brit’s resolve. However, they had few guns and appealed to the U.S. We, especially the NRA, sent them thousands of privately owned rifles and shotguns.

    But as soon as the war was over, the Brits collected the guns. So they were disarmed. Check out this funny but sad video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmTNZfR4dNw

    The cops have no guns, no billy clubs, and no respect. London bobbies used to have impressive billy clubs and tall hats with the Queen’s emblem. Now they turn tail and run, though they outnumber the criminal 11-1. As the Bible says, how the mighty have fallen.

    When people are disarmed physically, if they are lucky they can be re-armed. But when they are disarmed mentally and spiritually, I don’t think there is much hope. Watch the video. See the future. Think about it.

  • Ralph Baker says:

    I am not religious however my wife is Jewish. We attended a local remembrance program. My sense is that we should also remember all the innocents who were murdered by the Nazi animals. It is a human tragedy as well as a Jewish one and must not be forgotten. Eisenhower made local Germans view the camps and ordered pictures taken so it could not be I do not understand why so many US Jews are not vehemently pro Second Amendment. It became clear to me when I heard a Chech man state that his last memory of his father was his firing an unregistered (and not thereby confiscated) rifle at German soldiers to allow the family time to escape out the back door to the woods. Would the Warsaw ghetto uprising have a different history if the Jews were armed?

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